Obtaining A Greek Citizenship

Strong ties with the Motherland

Throughout history, Greeks have been the travelling kind of people. In some cases, our ancestors ventured out to conquer foreign lands and spread our culture and language. In most cases, though, they travelled far and wide to settle on every corner of the world and start anew in hopes of a better future. No matter the reason, the era, the way, or the destination, all Greek immigrants seem to have one thing in common: love for our homeland.greek

These strong ties with our Motherland appear to stand the test of time, and even become stronger, as time goes by. They also wonderfully transfer from one generation to the next. Thus, you end up with second and third generation Greek-Americans, who speak the language, uphold the values, follow the traditions, listen to the news, visit the old village, worry about Greece.

Many foreign nationals of Greek decent, or with a Greek psyche, wish to obtain the strongest of all ties to our country of origin – they wish to become Greek citizens. There are a few ways to achieve this, depending on the status, place of birth, timing, origins, and so on. Brace yourselves, since the options are many and convoluted. Let’s explore them.

Greek citizenship by birth

A child born in Greece does not automatically obtain Greek citizenship, unless:DSC_4157

  1. her/his mother was a Greek citizen during her pregnancy and at the time of her/his birth; or
  2. her/his father was a Greek citizen at the time of her/his birth; or
  3. both her/his parents were non-Greek immigrants living in Greece with a valid resident’s permit for at least five (5) consecutive years prior to her/his birth.

If one of these requirements is met, the child can obtain Greek citizenship by birth. The parents, of course, can opt out and declare another country’s citizenship (according to that country’s laws).

Becoming a Greek citizen by going to school

file9021268338436A child not fulfilling any of the prerequisites mentioned above, can still obtain a Greek citizenship, if:

  1. she/he enrolls at the First Grade of a primary Greek school and is still attending, when the application is filed; and
  2. at least one of her/his parents has/have been living in Greece legally with a valid permit for at least 5 years prior to the child’s birth (if less than 5 years, then they have to wait until the parents’ legal residency surpasses the 10 year mark); and
  3. at least one of the parents has to be holder of a legal resident’s card, as described in the new statute; and
  4. she/he has not reached the age of 18 years.

Alternatively, a non-Greek minor legally residing in Greece can still obtain Greek citizenship, if she/he has attended at least 9 years of primary/secondary Greek school or 6 years of secondary Greek school; whereas a non-Greek adult legally residing in Greece can obtain Greek citizenship if she/he has obtained a high school diploma in Greece and then graduated from a Higher Education Institution (University or Technical Education Institution). Furthermore, as soon as these Greek educated people obtain their Greek citizenship, their underage and unmarried children automatically become Greek citizens, as well.

Claiming your Greek citizenship through your ancestors

Those, who are born outside of Greece to either one or both Greek parents, or even one or more Greek grandparents, are entitled to stake a claim to their right to a Greek citizenship through their ancestor(s) born in Greece.

Other ways to obtain a Greek citizenship

There are a few other clearly defined ways to obtain a Greek citizenship, which are relevant to specific situations:

  1. Minors under the age of 18 years, who were born out of wedlock, can be legally recognized by their Greek father, who was born in Greece, and thus acquire a Greek citizenship.
  2. Minors under the age of 18 years can be legally adopted by a Greek national born in Greece, and thus acquire a Greek citizenship.
  3. Aliens of Greek ethnic origin admitted to military academies as officers, or enlisted in the armed forces as volunteers, or promoted to officers of the military forces, can lawfully acquire s Greek citizenship.
  4. Foreigners, who do not have any Greek origin or ancestry, but have a long term and permanent residency in Greece, can go through the naturalization process after three (3) to seven (7) years of consecutive legal residence in Greece, provided that they are fluent in Greek, and they earn a certificate in Greek ancient history and culture.

Marriage to a Greek citizen will not give you automatically a claim to a Greek citizenship, it will merely shorten the times required for a naturalization procedure.

Re-establishing connection…

What do you do, if you fall into one of these categories and you want to go ahead in the pursuit of your Greek citizenship? The procedures are different, depending on which category one falls into. The most common one is the situation, where someone has a Greek parent or grandparent. Here are the prerequisites for obtaining Greek citizenship by a person of Greek descent, who lives outside of Greece:

  1. Application (provided by the consulate). The application is in Greek and should be filled out in Greek. We will help with that. It will be completed, signed and submitted to the Greek Consul General closest to the Applicant’s residency. The signing of the application will be witnessed by two (2) Greek citizens, who will prove their citizenship (passport, Greek ID etc). Oftentimes, Consulate employees act as witnesses.
  2. Copy of a valid passport or other travel document. The original document must also be presented.
  3. Birth Certificate of Applicant.
  4. Marriage Certificate of Applicant’s parents AND Birth Certificates of parents (if they were born in Greece or are Greek citizens). If they were/are not, then (in addition to the prior) Marriage Certificate of grandparents AND their Birth Certificates … and so on and so forth, until we reach an ancestor, who is/was a Greek citizen.
  5. Applicant’s Criminal Record.
  6. Recent, colored, passport-size pictures.
  7. Interview.

All documents must be translated to Greek by a lawyer, the consulate, or a registered translator.

There are a lot of advantages to acquiring a Greek citizenship, like the ability to travel and work within the EU, but there is a catch: all male Greek citizens between the ages of 19 and 45 are required by law to join the military and serve for at least nine (9) months.

It might be a long and cumbersome process with a lot of red tape and sometimes frustration, but I believe that it is certainly worth it. I always experienced a special feeling of achievement, every time I helped someone start this process, every time I guided someone through it, and every time we successfully completed it. It is an uplifting and proud feeling to be a citizen of our Hellas.

I encourage you to ask questions in the comments below.

107 thoughts on “Obtaining A Greek Citizenship

      1. Thank you for providing this information. Do you know by chance how long it typically takes for the military to get in contact with the Greek Embassy? I submitted my papers in Greece and I am waiting so I can get my deferment.

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      2. Hello, Billy.
        You are very welcome.
        Thank you for your question.
        This is a process that usually takes no more than a week or so. Has it been longer in your case? Where did you submit your documents? At the Greek Embassy in Washington DC?
        Best Regards,
        Christos Kiosses

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    1. Γεια σου,

      I am hoping to to acquire Greek citizenship for me and my father. My Yiayia(paternal) lived in Greece until she was 20 before moving to the US. Both of my parents are of Greek decent but only my one of my grandparents was born there while the rest of my great parents were born there. I was wondering how to start the process and what all I will need. Do I need my Yiayia’s birth certificate from Greece and the US? And then I need her marriage certificate to my pappou along with my father and I’s birth certificate correct? Also we are both Greek Orthodox so we can provide baptism/chrismation certificates as well
      Thank you,
      Βασίλης

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      1. Καλησπέρα, Βασίλη.

        Thank you for your message. I believe that you should scan and email me all the relevant documents (christos@kiosses.com), so I can determine the best way to go about this. Did your grandmother marry your grandfather in a Greek Orthodox Church? That’s also important. As soon as I have the documents, I will contact you and we will set out a plan.
        All my best.
        Sincerely,
        Christos Kiosses

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  1. Great Info. So what happens when you can’t get a birth certificate from the Greek parent who was born in Greece or any other family member. I am half Greek but have no contact with my Greek family. Any help would be appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tana,
      Thank you for your kind words. You don’t need to contact your Greek family in order to obtain a birth certificate. The relevant Municipal authorities will issue one for you, provided you show them the direct lineage to the person you seek a certificate for. Please, contact me if you need more information or if I can be of assistance to you in any way.

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  2. My sister married a Greek Citizen, born in Greece, in 1982, I read that she would have acquired Greek Citizenship based upon her marriage, is this true?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your question, Warren. Marriage to a Greek citizen will not give you automatically a claim to a Greek citizenship, it will merely shorten the times required for a naturalization procedure. She would have to establish a long term and permanent residency in Greece through he marriage to a Greek citizen, and then go through the naturalization process. For more case-specific information, please, contact me and we can discuss further.

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  3. Hi Christos,
    I was born in the United States to Greek father who moved here. I have all the documents necessary. Do I need to be in Greece to start the process? Is there an application? Do I need to go and speak with the Consulate (Los Angeles)? What do I need to do?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Ilia! Thanks for the question! No, you do not need to be in Greece to start the process. You could send be the documents for review, if you want, before you start the process with the Consulate General.

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  4. Hello!
    Where do I look do I begin the process of obtaining greek citizenship through grandparents? My Grandmother, Golfo, was born in Greece and married an American in the Air-force and moved to the states. I am Unable to find the proper government documents on obtaining citizenship through grandparents, can you provide a resource so that I might begin that process? Is there anything I will need immediately?

    Thank you!!
    -Janelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Janelle!
      Thank you for reading my article and contacting me! Where was your Grandmother, Golfo, born? What Municipality in Greece? They should have records of her birth and should give you a birth certificate, so you can start the process of claiming your Greek citizenship. If you want any assistance in tracking those documents, please, contact me and I will be glad to help.

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  5. Hi thanks for your great article. I’m a Brit married to a Greek with permanent residency and Greek child, living in Greece for 12 years BUT to my shame my Spoken Greek is not great – please could you tell me where I can find out more about the level of Greek needed?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Judy!
      Thank you for your kind words!
      There is absolutely no shame! Greek is a very difficult language and it is never too late to start!
      The short answer to your question would be that you need a certificate from any Greek Language school that you have successfully completed their course. If you do not have such a diploma (because you learned Greek through family or business/professional interaction, etc.), you can prove your Greek language skills at the interview.
      If you would like more information and sources, please, contact me so I can send you the relevant links.

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  6. Thanks for providing this information. What is up with the requirement for baptism papers? While I am not religious, I was baptized Catholic as my mom’s side follows that denomination. Is someone required to be Greek Orthodox in order to apply? I have always been proud of my Greek heritage. I am sad that I can’t obtain citizenship without having to spend nine months in the military.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Theo,
      You are very welcome and thank you for your questions!
      For the process of obtaining one’s Greek citizenship, there is no need to prove that the applicant is Greek Orthodox. In fact, the applicant’s religious beliefs are of no consequence. It might be true that the dominant religion in Greece is the Eastern Greek Orthodox, but there are many proud Greeks, who are Jewish, Muslim, Catholic, Jehova’s witnesses, atheist, etc.
      As for the military service, as long as you maintain your status as a Greek citizen permanently residing abroad, your obligation to serve the armed forces is postponed. If you lose that status (for example by staying in Greece for more than 180 days per calendar year) and you are under 45 years of age, you will have to serve.
      If you have any more questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

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  7. Both my parents were born in Greece, near Kozani. I have not been able to find where I can find their birth certificates, and or marriage license. He returned to Greece to serve his conscription and marry her; there was a big age difference and when he passed away I was young but remember it was difficult to find his birth certificate for social security, I guess it was found. I have located copies of their arrivals, U.S. naturalization, WWll draft card.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Hello Christos
    I am in the process of gathering all my documents for Greek Citizenship through my grandfather, born in Greece. I have all documents proving my Greek lineage , however I am having difficulty obtaining my grandparents Marriage Certificate in South Africa. I have other legal documents proving the marriage . Will this suffice? I have Death Notices from the High Court , confirming place of Marriage as well as Estate Files proving this.
    Regards
    Mirinda
    South Africa

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Mirinda!
      Thank you for your comment and your question! Where were your grandparents married? Where was their marriage registered? If you want. you can scan and email me your documents, so I can take a look at them and try to be of assistance.
      All my best,
      Christos

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  9. Hi Christos,

    I am currently in the process of gathering all the documents I need to obtain my Greek citizenship. I am also trying to purchase a home on the island of Lesvos. My father is Greek and was born in Greece. My mother is American and they currently are divorced and live in Michigan. I also live in Michigan. They were married in Reno Nevada and lived in the San Francisco area when I was born. I will first register my parents marriage with the proper Greek authorities, then apply for my citizenship. With this being said, I have to work with two Greek Embassies. I should have all the documents I need Apostilled within the next couple of weeks. Do you know how long it usually takes to to get my parents marriage registered and how long it will take to get my citizenship afterwards? It has been difficult working with both consulates because they are not close and sometimes I cannot a hold of anyone and I have yet to receive responses to the emails I have been asked to send. I am also afraid the slow responses or lack of response is an indicator of how the application process will go. I am concerned be caused the owners of the house in Greece that I want to purchase may not wait too long for me to get my citizenship. Would it be in my best interest to travel to Greece and take care of everything at once?
    Thank you!
    Maria

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Maria!
      Thank you for your message.
      It appears that you are doing all the right things. It’s a pity that the Greek Consulates are not being very helpful in the process of getting your parents’ wedding registered.
      It is very difficult, if not impossible, to predict how long the whole process will take.
      Did they advise you that you need to be a Greek citizen, before you purchase the property in Greece?
      Please, send me an email with more information and further details, so I can look into it and try to help you get it done.
      Best Regards,
      Christos

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  10. Hello Christo,

    I read that you stated, “For the process of obtaining one’s Greek citizenship, there is no need to prove that the applicant is Greek Orthodox. In fact, the applicant’s religious beliefs are of no consequence.” However, there is another website, http://livingingreece.gr/2007/07/09/acquiring-greek-citizenship-by-foreign-nationals-of-greek-origin/ , that states that your certificate of baptism/christening is one of the documents needed to obtain citizenship. Might you be willing to clarify this further?

    Thank you for your time!

    Sincerely,

    Gigi

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Gigi.
      Thank you for your comment and for the opportunity you give me to clarify this matter.
      I will avoid criticism of the many other sites around the internet, claiming to provide sound information on legal issues. One should be very careful and always get professional legal assistance, when it is time to obtain their Greek citizenship.
      Having said that, I will confirm again that the applicant’s religious beliefs are of no consequence. Even though most Greeks belong to the Greek Orthodox Christian Church, there are many other Faiths, Beliefs, Dogmas, Churches, or even absence of religious beliefs (Atheism, Agnosticism, etc.) shared among Greek citizens.
      In conclusion, a Certificate of Baptism/Christening is optional in the required documentation attached to the application for obtaining Greek citizenship. It might be helpful, if birth records have been lost or destroyed.
      If you have any other questions, please, contact me.
      Sincerely,
      Christos

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you very much; this is great to hear!Though “that other website” said that the documents were “needed”, I realize that it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are “required”, though the way it was worded strongly leads to that conclusion, imo. I have avoided pursuing my Greek citizenship for many years because I thought that being Greek Orthodox was required. Perhaps I should have looked into the matter futher haha. I think I just might now. Thank your for your help. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Hello Christo,

    I am helping my husband find the necessary documents for his grandfather who was born in Greece. I am having trouble finding a marriage certificate. He became a naturalized American and my husband is his grandson from his second marriage to an American woman. The family is now getting suspicious that he may not have been legally married although his name and his wife’s name are on their children’s birth certificates. Will this be a problem in trying to obtain Greek citizenship for my husband?

    Thank you in advance for your response.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Linda!
      Thank you for your comment. Can you, please, tell me what documentation you have managed to collect up to this point? Do you have his grandfather’s birth certificate from Greece? Are we talking about his paternal grandparents or his maternal? Do we have birth certificates and marriage certificates of his parents?
      If you wish, you could email me directly scans of the documents you have obtained up to now. That way I will be able to determine what we are still missing and whether we can overcome or substitute any missing documents. My email is christos@kiosses.com
      All my best.
      Christos

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  12. My great-grandmother was born in Cyprus around 1900. Can I acquire Greek citizenship through ancestry? Could my mother obtain it through her grandmother and then transmit it to me?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Matt.
      Thanks for your question. As I understand from your comment, your great-grandmother was a Greek-Cypriot. Was she ever registered with the Greek authorities as a Greek citizen? If not, then she was most likely a Cypriot citizen. You could potentially pursue a Cypriot citizenship, if you wish to do so. I am not familiar with the immigration and citizenship legal frame of Cyprus.
      Best Regards,
      Christos

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  13. My parents were both born and married in Greece.
    I also married a Greek Citizen, I was born in the United States.
    Few questions,
    I have my birth certificate that was translated officially by the lexarcheio.
    My Parents marriage certificate.
    My Parents oikogeniaki Merida Kai katstasi.
    My Father’s Mitron Arrenon document.
    What’s the next step?
    Where do I submit these documents?
    Do I need a verification of Greek Nationality?
    That’s what City Hall demands..
    Do I need a Mitron Arrenon document?
    Can you please help?
    Thank you,
    George

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, George.
      Thank you very much for your comment and your questions. I understand that you have all the necessary documents to obtain your Greek Citizenship. I will be very happy to assist you in that process. You need to visit the closest Greek Consulate General and ask for the Vital Records department to register your birth. They will draft a Greek Birth Certificate, which has to be sent to the Special Registry in Athens (either by you, a person on your behalf, or the Consulate itself). After the Special Registry has received it and issued its own certificate, then it has to be submitted to the Municipal Authorities, so you can be registered there and finally get your Greek ID and Greek Passport. For further information, please, send me an email at christos@kiosses.com, so we can discuss the next steps.
      Sincerely,
      Christos

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      1. Thank you very much, Chris !!!
        The info that you have given is very helpful!
        I will follow your advice.
        Forgot to mention, I am living in Greece with my Wife and Son.
        Does that advice still adhere, when in Greece?
        Have a great summer and thank you, Counselor.
        George

        Liked by 1 person

  14. My grandmother was born on Samos in 1902, before it became part of Greece in 1913. She immigrated to the United States in 1920 from Samos. I have a birth certificate for her. My grandfather (also of Greek descent) was born in Turkey in 1894. I have no records of his birth. He was educated on Samos and immigrated to the United States in 1916. If I can obtain proper documentation of these facts, would this allow me to make a claim for Greek citizenship?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, David.

      Thanks a lot for your comment. In order for us to determine whether you can claim your Greek citizenship, we need to verify that one of your Grandparents was registered with the Greek Municipal Authorities (Δημοτολόγιο). We have to obtain a certificate from the Municipal Authorities of Samos that proves Birth and Registry of your Grandmother within the family file (Οικογενειακή Μερίδα).
      Please, email me with scans of the documents and a short description, so we can take a closer look and figure out what your chances are.
      Have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

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  15. Hello David,
    I need some direction, both my parents were born in Greece, Siatisa, Macedonia a municipality of Kozani. I do not have their birth certificates; problematical as my father was born 1894-6, My mother probably not so as she was born in 1914. Nor do I have their marriage certificate, most likely married in Siatisa. My sisters, brother and I were all born in the US.
    I have my fathers US Naturalization papers (he immigrated years prior to his marriage to my mother. I do have arrival information for my father and for both of them when they married.
    I am now in touch with my first cousin and his son. I would like to know how to go about obtaining the necessary data and process for a Greek passport.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Virginia.

      Thank you for your message. If you could, please, scan and email me your documents, I will need to review and analyze them, so I can determine whether you will be able to obtain your Greek Citizenship through your ancestors.
      I will be waiting for your email at christos@kiosses.com
      Have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos

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  16. Hello,
    I have a Greek grandmother that I would like to apply for citizenship through. However, I understand that this process is sometimes made shorter if you have a Greek parent – if my father, who was born before 1984 and could (as I understand it) go through a simpler registration process, got citizenship first? My grandmother is still alive, and we would be able to easily obtain copies of her birth certificate, marriage certificate, etc…
    Thanks for your help,
    Nicholas

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Nicholas.
      Thank you for your comment. Yes, most times it is much easier to determine and obtain one’s Greek citizenship from a parent, rather than from a grandparent. Can you, please, send me more detailed information via email, so I can determine whether this is how we should go about it in your case? (christos@kiosses.com)
      Have a wonderful day.
      Best Regards,
      Christos

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  17. Hi there. I’m a US born citizen with Greek born parents. I have all my documents ready to begin my process for applying for Greek citizenship/ passport but don’t want to file in US consulates as I hear it takes much longer and so far they’ve been incredibly unhelpful and only caused me setbacks by not communicating properly what is need to obtain a passport. I would like to do this directly in Greece by going there. Do you know where in Athens I would need to go? Thank you in advance.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Maria.
      Thank you for your comment and your questions. I totally understand your frustration, because many of our Consulates, if not all of them, are understaffed and overworked. Consequently, there are very long waiting periods. Could you, please, send me scans of your documents directly to my email (christos@kiosses.com) so I can review and let you know exactly what you need to do. You would probably have to go to the Special Registry in Athens (Ειδικό Ληξιαρχείο), but I will have to review your documents, before I am able to give you a definite answer.
      Kind Regards,
      Christos

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  18. Hello,

    My father was from Greece, a town called Spercheiada, near Lamia. How can I find out who to contact to get his birth certificate?

    Also what happens if you obtain military postponement, and while you have it, you advance past the age of 45?

    Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Elias.

      The easiest way to obtain your father’s birth certificate would be to contact Spercheiada’s Municipal Authorities. If you need any assistance with this, please, send me an email directly at christos@kiosses.com and we can discuss further.

      As for your second question, what was the reason of the military postponement? Was it medical reasons? Studies? Becoming a permanent resident of another country? Can you be more specific, please?

      I will be looking forward to your response.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

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  19. Hello,

    I was born in the U.S. however my father is from Thessaloniki and recently passed away. My older brother and sister were both born in the U.S. as well however were registered by my father in Greece, and I was not. My parents were also divorced in March of 1986 and I was born in September of that year, so was technically born out of marriage. I’m wondering if I have the ability to apply for dual citizenship, and have found lots of different information online. Are you able to clarify? My birth certificate does list him as my father.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Larissa.
      Thank you for the very interesting question. According to Greek Law, a child born within 300 days after the dissolution or annulment of marriage, is considered to be a child born into wedlock. Consequently, you are not born out of wedlock. Please, scan and email me your documents (christos@kiosses.com), and I believe that you have a very good chance of obtaining your Greek Citizenship.
      Best Regards,
      Christos

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      1. Thank you! I’ll be reaching out, I also referred you to my family that is currently in Kalamaria dealing with the inheritance process and looking for help.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Teddy.
      Thank you for the very important and interesting question.
      Unfortunately, according to Greek Law, one cannot obtain Greek Citizenship through a descendant. The only way for you to pursue a Greek Citizenship would be to go and live in Greece (if the divorce has not been filed in Greece) as the spouse of a Greek citizen and apply for citizenship after a minimum of 3 years.
      If you have any further questions, please, send me an email at christos@kiosses.com
      Thank you and have a nice evening.
      Best Regards,
      Christos

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  20. I’m born outside marriage for a canadian mother and greek father, i have 20 years now, and i don’t know how to get a greek citizenship! In the law, a father can recognize a illegitimate child after the 18, my father can recognize me and i get a faster naturalization process? If yes, how long the process will go? 1 year? 2? And also, i plan to fly to greece with my dad with a canadian visa, how i do to stay in the country to work in the process of naturalization without break the greek law? Thank you, you site is great! Please respond faster, thanks for Canada.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If my father recognize me in the greek government and after this i enter in the greek army being ethnically greek , it’s more easy get the citizenship after this right? How long the army period is? If the process of naturalization is too long, this is a better option? Also how i do to stay in greece not being citizen to apply to citizenship, my dad can say to government i’m her son to me not got deported?

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      1. Hello, Justin.
        Thank you for your comments. You have raised a number of issues and I will try to give you a few answers. If I don’t cover all your inquiries, please, contact me on my private email christos@kiosses.com
        A father can voluntarily recognize their child out of wedlock. There is no statute of limitations on this. If your father has a family file with the Municipal Authorities in Greece, as soon as he recognizes you, you can then be registered in that family file and obtain your Greek Citizenship. The process does not take very long, if you do it right. You can do it within a few months. You can fly to Greece and stay for a limited amount of time. I advise you to start the process by going to a Notary Public in Greece and having your father voluntarily recognize you. You do not have to serve in the Greek army, after you obtain your Greek citizenship, unless you want to or unless you stay in Greece for a period longer than 180 days. If you stay for a period of more than 180, you automatically and silently accept the fact that you have become a permanent resident of Greece and you are obliged to serve.
        If you have any more questions, please, contact me via email, as I mentioned above.
        Have a nice day.
        Sincerely,
        Christos Kiosses

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  21. Two questions regarding the process to gain Greek citizenship.
    First…My father was born and raised in Athens but came to the US for college and decided to stay. Because of that, he never registered to vote and he never signed up for military service in Greece so he is not registered with a local municipality. This is creating a roadblock for me. Any suggestions?
    Second… I would like to obtain citizenship for my son (22) as well. You mentioned that males need to enlist and serve at least nine months in the military. How would that work if lives in the US and doesn’t speak any Greek?

    Thank you in advance for your assistance.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Alicia.
      Thank you for your questions. Let me try to answer both of them:
      First… I am pretty sure that your father has been registered with the Municipal Authorities. Not registering to vote or not signing up to serve in the military does not mean that one is not registered with the Municipal Authorities. Please, email me your father’s information (First name, last name, his father’s name, his mother’s name, place of birth, and date of birth) and I will try to pull up his Municipal information. My email address is christos@kiosses.com
      Second… All males from the age of 18 to the age of 45 need to fulfill their obligation to serve the Greek military ONLY if they become permanent residents of Greece. You son is within the age limits, but will only have to serve (after he obtains his Greek citizenship), if he stays in Greece for a period of over 6 months per calendar year (thus becoming a permanent resident of Greece). Otherwise, he will never have to serve.
      You are very welcome. I will be looking forward to your email.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

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  22. Hello, my boyfriend was born in the USA, his mother was Greek.He wants to apply for his Greek passport.He is based in the usa.Can you advise him of what he needs to do to apply as he is keen to do this as soon as possible.Does he need to travel to Greece to do this or can he do it via the Greek embassy in the USA? Any advice you can give us would be appreciated as he is keen to get it as soon as possible.How long does the process normally take
    Best wishes
    Jane Gaston

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Jane.

      Thank you for your comment and question.
      Your boyfriend will not need to travel to Greece to go through the process of obtaining his Greek Citizenship. We can do this through the Greek Consulate that serves the area of his residence. The process (depending on his particular case) might take anywhere from 3 months to a year. I will be able to give you a much more specific answer, if you send me scans of all the relevant documentation (who is the Greek ancestor? do we have their Birth Certificate? etc.)
      Please, send me a detailed email (christos@kiosses.com) so we can start the process.
      Warm Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  23. I was marriThx.to a Greek man for five years (1976-1981) during which time I resided and worked in Greece and became fluent in the language with university level courses, and I bore a daughter. She has resided in Greece her entire life and has given me 2 grandchildren. I want to return there to work and live near the kids. Can I get a work permit or citizenship through my daughter and grandchildren? Thx.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Beth.

      Thank you for the very interesting question. I have some questions, as well, so I can give you a detailed answer:
      1) Was your marriage a Religious one? (Greek Orthodox, Catholic, Jewish, etc.)
      2) After 1981, did you get a legal divorce or were you simply separated?
      3) If you were divorced, have you ever registered the divorce with the Greek Authorities?
      Please, send me an email with all these details (christos@kiosses.com) and we can figure out what to do next.
      To give you an idea: If you were married with a Religious Wedding and the marriage was never disolved (or the divorce was never registered with the Greek Authorities) then you can obtain your Greek Citizenship. Before the year 1982 every female person from another country, who was married to a Greek Citizen, could obtain her Greek Citizenship.

      In conclusion, you will not obtain your Greek Citizenship through your descendants, but rather through your marriage to a Greek Citizen.
      I will be looking forward to your email.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  24. I have a child born out of wedlock here in the US. Paternity is being established in the Courts and her Dad is on her birth certificate and she has his last name. My parents are from Greece. I was born here in the US but was granted dual-citizenship. My parents want my daughter to have dual citizenship too. Does her name need to be changed to include my last name (my parents last name)? Someone told me that is a requirement since she was not born within a marriage if we are going to apply for dual-citizenship for her. Does her last name have bearing on anything? Thanks for the guidance.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Josie.

      Thanks for the interesting question.
      If I may make an observation: The moment a father is mentioned in the Birth Certificate, it is automatically assumed to be a direct recognition of paternity. In other words, having the father’s name on the birth certificate establishes an automatic legal relationship between the father and the child. Why are you going through the Courts to establish paternity?
      As for your daughter’s Greek Citizenship (dual citizenship), you can go ahead and start the process of registering her under your Municipal Family File. She does not need to change her name. If you scan and email me the relevant documents (christos@kiosses.com) I can guide you through the process.
      Warm Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  25. Hello,
    My father was born/raised in Greece and was 100% Greek, but came to the US many years ago. My mother was born here in the US and has no Greek ancestry. My father and mother were never married, and I was assigned my mother’s last name; but my father was still listed on my Texas birth certificate. My father passed away in 2001. I was not baptized in the Greek Orthodox Church, but instead baptized in a protestant Christian church in the US. I have Greek relatives (both in Greece and here in the US) who recognize the validity of my father’s relationship to me, but it is unlikely that he officially registered me in Greece as his child. Does this preclude me from obtaining Greek citizenship?
    Regards!
    George (Chris)

    Like

    1. Hello, George.
      Thank you for your message and all the information. From the information you are providing, I believe that there is still hope. Please, scan and email me your Birth Certificate and all the information on your father (First Name, Last Name, his father’s name, his mother’s name, place of birth, and date of birth). My email is christos@kiosses.com
      As soon as I have that information, I will be able to tell you whether we can pursue your Greek Citizenship.
      Thank you and have a Happy New Year.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  26. Dear Christo,
    My mother is Greek, father British, I was born in the states. Many years ago I tried to get citizenship while in Greece….was given the run around. Can you help?? Planning on moving to Greece…
    Kalh xponia!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello, Stefanie.

      Thank you for your message and all the information. It is very important to figure out whether you can obtain your Greek Citizenship through your mother. It depends on whether your mother kept her Greek Citizenship, when she married your father. Please, email me scans of: a) your mother’s Municipal Record from Greece, b) your parents’ Marriage Certificate, and c) your Birth Certificate. These will give me a good idea on how we might be able to proceed. My email address is christos@kiosses.com
      Thank you and have a Happy New Year.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  27. Hello Christos,
    I would like to retire in Greece and obtain dual citizenship between Greece and the U.S.
    My mother’s parents were Greek. They immigrated to the U.S. and had dual citizenship.
    They traveled back and forth a few times and had property in a village on Mitilini. But…I don’t believe either had Greek birth certificates because they were born around Smyrna and were forced to leave because of the war and the population exchange. Also my Popoo was orphaned. I am thinking they must have created some official papers when they arrived in the Municipality of Mitilini. I have my Yiayia’ passport, mother’s birth certificate and baptismal and my parents marriage document from the Greek Orthodox church. If I have all other documents but lack my Grandparents birth certificate is it feasible to apply for Greek citizenship? I am sure I would need the residency documents from Mitilini. How does one go about obtaining them?

    Efgaristo Boule,
    ~Paul

    Like

    1. Hello, Paul.
      Thank you for your message and your very interesting story!
      We will definitely need the Municipal Records. At the moment, the whole system of Municipal Records in Greece is down. They are upgrading the system to a new record keeping system, which they will call “Citizen’s Registry” (Μητρώο Πολίτη), if my information is correct. This new system will be up and running after Jan. 26th (fingers crossed).
      In the meantime, please, scan and send me your documents, so I can review and analyze to form an opinion (christos@kiosses.com).
      Thank you and have a nice day.
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  28. Hi Christos! I thought I left a message before, but it may have been deleted accidentally. I am wondering whether you have helped in the past someone of Greek descent whose maternal great grandmother came from Greece gain Greek citizenship. I think I have all the documents necessary to apply, but I am wondering: Does the Greek Consulate of Chicago process applications for fourth generationers, or do you think they will give me trouble? Thank you so much for answering our questions publicly! It is so helpful.

    Best,
    M

    Like

    1. Hello, Mary!
      Thank you for your message and for your kind words!
      I just saw your previous and this message. To answer your question: When we are trying to obtain Greek Citizenship through a grandmother or great-grandmother, we have to be very careful. Unfortunately, Greek Law in the past did not favor women, in a sense that a person would derive their citizenship through their father. Many Greek women would actually lose their citizenship, if they would marry a foreign person of a different religion. For example: a Greek Orthodox woman would marry a Muslim/Jew/Protestant/Atheist US Citizen => she would lose her Greek Citizenship and considered to assume her husband’s citizenship.
      That’s why I will need to review and analyze all your documents, to be able to determine what our chances are.
      Please, send me scans of all your documents (christos@kiosses.com) and I will give you my two cents.
      Thank you again and have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  29. Hello Christos,

    I am interested in obtaining dual citizenship by descent. My grandfather was born in Greece and is now an American citizen. Before I embark on this project, though, I need to know if I have a legitimate claim –– my father was legally adopted by my grandfather, so technically I am not Greek by blood. Does this preclude me from applying for dual citizenship?

    Thanks very much for your help,

    Anna Demetriades

    Like

    1. Hello, Anna.
      Thank you for your message and the very interesting question. It gives me the opportunity to touch on the subject of adoption by a Greek Citizen.
      The first question is was your father adopted, before he became of age? In other words, was he a minor, when he was adopted? If yes, then he has the right to claim his Greek citizenship and it will have retrospective effect to the date of his adoption. He will be considered to be a Greek Citizen from the moment the adoption procedure was finalized. If he was adopted as an adult, he will not be able to claim Greek Citizenship.
      The second question is whether both the adoptive parents are Greek. If they are both Greek Citizens (and the adopted child was a minor at the time of the adoption) then the child claims their Greek Citizenship with Direct Registration. If only the adoptive father is a Greek Citizen, then the child will obtain their Greek Citizenship through determination.
      I hope this helps. If you fall into one of the categories above, please, send me your information and all the relevant documents at christos@kiosses.com
      Have a nice evening.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

      1. Thanks for your prompt reply, Christos. My dad was a minor when adopted by my grandfather, who married my dad’s mother (not Greek). My dad is not interested in pursuing dual citizenship, but I would like to apply.

        Like

  30. Hello,
    So my father was born in Greece, but came here when he was young. Can I get citizenship. He doesn’t have his birthday certificate. He was born in 1946. Came here in 51′. I was born August 1982.
    Thank you

    Like

    1. Hello, Sarena.

      Thank you for your message. If you can, please, send me the information on your father (First Name, Last Name, Father’s Name, Mother’s Name, Date of Birth, Place of Birth) through email at christos@kiosses.com, maybe I can find his information. It is important that he was registered with the Municipal Authorities. As soon as we find that record, we will be able to determine how we wil proceed with your Greek Citizenship.
      I will be looking out for your email.
      Have a nice evening.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  31. Hi,

    My great-grandfather immigrated from Greece. He married my great-grandmother and had my grandmother nearly 20 years before he was naturalized. Is it possible for me to get Greek citizenship? If so, what all do I need? I have some of the paperwork, but not my great-grandfather’s birth certificate.

    Like

    1. Hello, ScientistMommy.
      Thank you for your comment and your questions. It is very important to find the Municipal Registry of your great-grandfather in Greece. After we find that record, we will use him as your anchor to Greece, establish an unbroken chain of vital records (Birth Certificates and Marriage Certificates) leading to you, and then try to prove to the Greek Immigration Authorities that you are of Greek descent. For that purpose, I will need you to scan and email me all the documents you have (christos@kiosses.com), so I can determine our chances of success.
      Thank you and have a nice evening.
      Warm Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  32. Hi Christos,

    I would like to know if I would be eligible before I further pursue dual citizenship. I am half Greek, from my mothers side. Her mother was born in the States, and unfortunately, her father, my grandfather, was the only one of his siblings not born in Greece. He was however, a dual citizen in America and Greece. His parents, my great-grandparents were both born in Greece and married there.

    Is it unrealistic to have success in applying using ancestry that dates back to my great-grandparents being the most recent to be born in Greece?

    Like

    1. Hello, Eleni.
      Thank you for your message and for all the information.
      I believe that you will have to scan and email me any and all documents proving what you have written (Naturalization Certificates, Birth Certificates, Passports, Marriage Certificates, and so on). After I review those, I will be able to determine whether you are eligible to obtain your Greek Citizenship. My email is christos@kiosses.com
      Thank you and have a nice evening.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  33. Hello Mr. Kiosses,
    Thank you for all the useful information. I have a situation you might be able to help me with.
    I am Greek-Canadian, both parents born in Greece and married in Greece before emigrating to Toronto, Canada, where I was born a year after they arrived.
    I obtained my signed and stamped official birth certificate from the Province of Ontario, Canada. It was certified, stamped and signed by the Greek Consulate in Toronto. It was then officially translated, notarized and signed while I was in Greece last year.
    From what I understand, to claim my Greek citizenship, I must now obtain my parents signed and stamped official birth and marriage certificates from their hometown, which is Soufli, Evros, Greece.
    What are the steps I would take after obtaining their documents?
    Thank you,
    Basil Papadimos

    ps- I work for a global NGO and am currently working in Thailand so if I can avoid having to return to Toronto, that would be great.
    thanks again.

    Like

    1. Hello, Basil.
      Thank you for your message and for all the information. I believe that I can assist you with your issue. Could you, please, email me a scan of your Birth Certificate (christos@kiosses.com) and information on your parents: First Name, Last Name, Father’s Name, Mother’s Name, Place of Birth, Year of Birth (for each one of your parents, please). I might be able to obtain their Municipal Records. After that, we will most likely be able to register you with a Power of Attorney, so you will not have to travel back to Canada or Greece.
      I will be waiting for your response.
      Have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  34. Hi
    My mother was born in Crete, moved to South Africa, married my father, but remained a greek citizen. I would like to know if I and my children can apply for greek citizenship? I live in South Africa, but need to get out of this country. Everything she has is in Greek and I do read or speak greek.

    Regards
    Rose

    Like

    1. Hello, Rose.
      Thank you for your message and for all the information. It is very significant to know when all this took place, was the marriage a religious one, was it performed in an Orthodox Church, and so on. Please, scan and email me all the documents you have, so I can get a better idea of the facts. My email is christos@kiosses.com
      Thank you and have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  35. Sir, As much as I have read your directions, I need to ask to be sure.
    My husband was born on Corfu, Greece. I am American as are our 4 children. We have spent 7 years, almost $10,000.00 and are on a second Attorney in Greece trying to get a “family paper”, as our oldest son was told he needs this to apply for Dual Citizenship. Is this document necessary? We have of course my husbands birth certificate, his Greek ID, our marriage certificate. We were married in America, Yonkers, New York as my husband has lived in America for 47 years . With my husband being a Greek born citizen, does our son need grandparent documents?

    Like

    1. Hello, Ms. Miaris.
      Thank you very much for your message and for all the information. If you have your husband’s Municipal registration in Greece (Family File or Οικογενειακή Μερίδα), then you do not need his parents’ registration. You mention that you have your husband’s Birth Certificate. Do you have his actual registration with the Municipal Authorities? The Birth Certificate (without the Municipal Record) is not sufficient. Would you mind emailing all those documents to me, so I can review? My email address is christos@kiosses.com
      Have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  36. Hi Mr. Kiosses,

    I am born and raised in Greece as is my fiance (attended school, university, etc., our parents are still in Greece as well) and we are currently expecting our first child in August. We have been living in the US for the last years and the baby will be born in US (Houston, TX, USA). We plan to wait for the father to recognize the baby and for our marriage due to silly insurance issues that would arise due to that so I will only register my baby in my name first. 1. Do you think that this would cause an issue? Is that something that can not be changed later on? 2. Do I need to go to the Greek Consulate in Houston in order to register the baby when it is born? 3. Can I apply here in Houston in the Consulate for the baby to get dual citizenship? 4. Do you know how long this process might take? 5. Are there any issues if we delay the whole process for later on or we should at least register the baby upon birth? 6. Do we need to have a US passport already for the baby when we initiate the process? Sorry for the tons of questions. As a first-time mom living in a foreign country I am a bit confused so if you have any info that might be helpful that would be great. I am just trying to find something to pinpoint me to the right direction so that I can start the process soon after birth. Thanks a lot for the helpful information here!! I really appreciate all the help!

    Like

    1. Hello, Magda.
      Thank you for your message and for all the information. I will try to answer your questions:
      1. Are you going to name him as the father of your child on the baby’s Birth Certificate? When is he going to recognize the child as his own? Are you planning on marrying in the near future?
      2. You can definitely register your child at the Consulate General of Greece in Houston. You will need the baby’s Birth Certificate and your Greek Passport/Greek ID/Driver’s License.
      3. After you register the child, you will need to take the Certificate from the Consulate and register the baby with the Special Registry in Athens. The final step is to take those certificates to the Municipal Authorities, where you have your Family Record (Οικογενειακή Μερίδα).
      4. If you let the process go through the Consulate and have them send the documents to Greece, it might take years for the registration to be finalized. If you do it yourself or have someone assist you (an Attorney for example), it will take a few weeks at most.
      5. I believe that there is a small fine, when you delay the baby’s registry. I’m not sure how much, but it’s not a lot. You can ask the Consulate for their fees.
      6. You do NOT need to have a US passport for the baby, before you register her with the Greek Authorities.
      Please, send me additional information through email at christos@kiosses.com
      If there’s anything else, please, let me know and I will try to assist as much as I can.
      Καλή λευτεριά!
      Best,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  37. Hi,

    I would like to know if my child has to be baptised in the Greek Orthodox Church in order to get her Greek passport?
    Her grandparents were both born in Greece and her father has dual citezenship. We are also unwed …will this affect things ?

    Regards,
    Jessica

    Like

    1. Hello, Jessica.
      Thank you for your message and your questions. You do not need to be baptized in a Greek Orthodox Church to obtain your Greek Citizenship. I need a lot more information to determine whether all this will affect her Greek Citizenship. Can you, please, send me an email with more information, like when was she born, when did her father obtain his Greek Citizenship, is he mentioned as her father on her Birth Certificate, did he “recognize” her as his child, what State are you in, and so on. It would also help, if you could provide scans of the certificates (father’s Municipal Record, Birth Certificate, your Birth Certificate, etc.). My email address is christos@kiosses.com.
      Thank you and have a nice weekend.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  38. Hi Christos,
    My grandparents are both Greek citizens and were born in Greece. I only have access to my grandmother’s birth certificate because I believe my grandfather’s was lost in a fire in the village. How do I acquire the application from the consolate? There is no information on the website for the embassy in my area. Also I feel more comfortable completing this process on my own, but I was wondering if a lawyer is needed.
    Thank you,
    Maria

    Like

    1. Hello, Maria.

      Thank you for your comment and your questions.
      Depending on what process you will have to follow (direct registration, determination of citizenship, evaluation of citizenship, naturalization, etc.), you will need different applications and certificates.
      You should book an appointment with the Vital Records Office of the Consulate General of Greece closest to your location. They will be able to review your documents and guide you through the proper process.
      If at any point you feel that you might need the assistance of an Attorney, please, send me an email at christos@kiosses.com.
      I wish you good luck.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  39. have applied for Greek citizenship from the Greek consulate in Alexandria,Egypt since 2010. Then I met with the consulate in the consulate and agreed to the paper and it was sent to Greece and I haven’t returned yet. We didn’t know any reasons why the papers didn’t come and the papers were sent in which my mother Greek and many members of my family there and they were getting it .. Some people say I have to go to Greece to ask about the papers but now I can not go ..Can you help with that and ask about it from there?

    Like

  40. Hi,

    I am preparing on meeting with the Houston consulate soon to apply for dual citizenship. I am working on applying through my yiayia, she was born in Athens, Greece and moved at the age of 20 in 1947. I have her Greek passport, her American passport, and her marriage certificate in the Greek Orthodox Church(married in the US). And my papou’s birth certificate/death certificate( was born in the US of Greek decent). I have both of my parents birth certificates, baptism certificates, and marriage certificate along with my birth certificate and baptism certificate. All of the marriage and baptism certificates are in the Greek Orthodox Church. Do I need my Yiayia’s muncipal record from Athens or will her Greek passport suffice for that? Also I am working on getting all of the documents translated in Greek with the Greek school teacher, she’s an approved translator. Can you think of any other documents I might need? Your blog has been very informative and I have learned a lot by reading your responses!

    Thank you,
    William

    Like

    1. Hello, William.
      Thank you for your message, for your kind words, and for the detailed information you provided.
      You will definitely need your grandmother’s Municipal Record, but it is something that the Consulate General can obtain through their intranet system.
      Did they tell you what application you will have to file? Is it determination of citizenship? Is it evaluation of citizenship? I am trying to understand why they asked you to translate the certificates.
      In the same note, I am not sure what other certificates you might need, because I don’t know what process you will follow.
      If you need my assistance in anything, please, send me an email with scans of the documents at christos@kiosses.com
      Thank you and have a nice day.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

      1. I will send you an email with the documents I have soon and provide some more information. I am looking forward to discussing this further!

        Thank you,
        William

        Like

  41. Hello! First off, thanks for having this website and replying to comments!

    I am hoping to claim Greek citizenship in order do my PhD in modern Greek history either in Greece or the EU. My mother’s parents were born and married in Greece, however they immigrated in 1963 and are now both are American citizens. My father is not Greek, but my mother and father were married in the Greek Orthodox Church.

    I know where my grandparents were born, married, and all the relevant dates. My mother and I both speak, read, and write Greek and we have many relatives in Greece, however we live in Southern California. I have some old IDs and passports from Greece for my grandparents, but beyond that we don’t have many documents. Can you point me the right direction of what my next steps might be?

    Any help would be greatly appreciated!! Thank you!

    Like

    1. Hello, Becca.
      Thank you very much for your comment, for the information, and for your kind words.
      It would be of great help, if I could take a look at those documents. It appears that the best way to go about this would be for your mother to apply for her Greek Citizenship through Direct Registration. That way she will obtain her Greek Citizenship retroactively from birth, meaning that you were born to a Greek Citizen. Thus, the door would open for you to apply.
      You absolutely need your grandparents’ Municipal Records from Greece. That’s where you should start.
      If you send me scans of the documents you have, I might be able to give you more information. christos@kiosses.com
      Thank you and have a nice day.
      Cordially,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  42. What a great site. I would like to obtain dual citizenship. Immigration records show that my grandfather and grand mother were from Smyrna, Greece.. 1888. The name of my Grandfather was Costas Calokarinos. According to “Ancestry.com” he became Costas Callas and migrated to the U.S. I have my fathers birth records, but I was told that people born in Smyrna .. records can not be obtained? Can you shed any light on this? Thanks in advance for your help.

    Like

    1. Hello, Sabra.
      Thank you very much for your kind words! I’m glad you liked my blog.
      It would be great, if you scanned and emailed me your grandparents’ records. Most of the Greeks, who were violently displaced from Asia Minor, were later recorded in Greece. There is a chance that we will find your ancestors’ records, but I need to see what you already have. You should also send me more information on them (First Name, Last Name, their parents’ first names, place of birth, and date of birth). My email address is christos@kiosses.com
      I hope that we will be able to trace and locate their Municipal Records.
      Have a nice evening.
      Sincerely,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  43. Hi Christos!

    My father is a born Greek citizen, moved to the US in 1970. Due to needing to sort out inheritance issues and land sales of family property in 2005, he has his birth certificate/baptism certificate and other paperwork with the stamped apostille. When visiting the Greek consulate in Chicago, he was also asked to establish surviving relatives and provided birth information for me and my siblings. We are all interested in obtaining our Greek citizenships. My father explained it as a simple process of traveling to the registry in Greece and registering us. He also believes that the information provided to the Greek consulate has been shared with the Greek government and should be enough to register us. Is this correct? If it is that simple, we are considering getting the tickets for him to travel across and get it done. Are there any documents we need to provide him with?

    If the process is not as simple, can you point us in the right direction? Also, once I have my citizenship, is the process the same to get my daughter registered for hers?

    ευχαριστώ πολύ for any and all information!

    Like

    1. Hello, Eleni, Alex, and Christina.
      Thank you for your message. If your father has already registered your births with the Greek Consulate when you were minors, then you are on your way to obtain your Greek Citizenship. If the visit to the Consulate General was more recent (meaning that you girls were already of age), you would absolutely need to be present or supply your father with a Power of Attorney to sign on your behalf. Apart from your Birth Certificates with the Seal of Hague (Apostille), you will need your US Passports and DL’s to prove your address. At that point, the Vital Records Office of the Consulate General will create Greek Birth Certificates for you along with a Certificate of Age and an Affidavit that you have never been registered in Greece before. The Greek Birth Certificate has to be filed with the Special Registry in Athens and then everything has to go to the relevant Municipal Authorities to open up separate family files for each one of you.
      As for your question, I’m pretty sure that your father will find it difficult to complete the process. From the information that you provided, it seems that he has not registered you and will not be able to do anything further in Greece.
      As soon as you get your Greek Citizenship, you can register your daughter and repeat the process for her, since she’s a minor.
      If you need my assistance with this, please, let me know. My email address is christos@kiosses.com
      Have a good night.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

  44. Hello, I have read that it takes up to 2-3 years to apply for citizenship by descent if you only have grandparents that were born in Greece as this is done via a non-expedited process. Is this the timeframe in most/all cases or is the 2-3 years just a maximum and often it is done in a matter of months?

    Like

    1. Hello, Richard.
      The time frame really depends on many different factors. First and foremost, what type of application one submits (direct registration, direct determination, indirect determination, evaluation of citizenship, or the naturalization process). The second most important factor is whether you will submit the application and supporting documents to the Consulate General to be processed or you will assign the process to a professional (Attorney). The Consulate General will forward the application through the proper channels, but it will take much longer. The third important factor is whether you need to have your parents obtain their citizenship, before you apply for yours.
      As you see, there’s no straight answer to your question. If you give me more information on your case, I will be able to give you a more specific answer (christos@kiosses.com).
      Thank you and have a nice evening.
      Best Regards,
      Christos Kiosses

      Like

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